How to: change oil and check tire pressures

#1
I need to change my oil. I can do it on my car, have the right filter, washer, and oil, but just need some instruction. This is something I can do myself right? 2009 Bonnie EFI ...

Also what is the best way to clean and grease my chain when I don't have a center stand? I also heard that when I winterize the bike it's good to have it on a center stand. Is there a cheap after market stand to put my bike on for the winter to take the pressure off the tires?

Thanks folks ...
 
#2
I need to change my oil. I can do it on my car, have the right filter, washer, and oil, but just need some instruction. This is something I can do myself right? 2009 Bonnie EFI ...

Also what is the best way to clean and grease my chain when I don't have a center stand? I also heard that when I winterize the bike it's good to have it on a center stand. Is there a cheap after market stand to put my bike on for the winter to take the pressure off the tires?

Thanks folks ...
You can easily change your oil on the Bonnie, most will save the crush washer to re use but if you have a new one, use it, the filter will spin off easily, be sure and put oil on the seal on the filter before installing it.
I believe there is a manual on the forum somewhere, if not get a manual and it will help you immensely.
As far as your chain without a centerstand, have a look with the search function, several guys have made their own axle stand.
 
#3
Here's my inexpensive jack. Works for changing oil, working on the chain and depending on where you position it you can raise the front or rear tire. Three 2x8's nailed together with a hole for a piece or pipe. The extra 3/4" plywood was added to accommodate the thruxton length shocks.

 

Twodogs

Street Tracker
#4






Like loxpump I use a similar stand but made out of 40 x40 x 3mm RHS. The lever is 1000mm and the base is 650mm. The jack is 200mm high and 300mm across. It could even be made out of 25 x 25mm as this would make it less obstructive when trying to access anything underneath but the way it is at the moment still allows me to drain the oil and remove the filter. It lifts the thruxton back wheel up by about 25mm and the Bonnie way up. When in this position there is not much weight on the front wheel so you can spin it for cleaning purposes quite easily and by just moving it forward slightly will lift the front wheel off the ground.

When changing the oil just make sure you do it hot (Wear Heat proof mechanic Gloves) as this stirs up the wear debris and the sludge and drains it all out, to do it cold is just a waste of time. For the cost of a washer replace it every time as it is good insurance because it prevents risking an oil leak that may get on your back tyre which is not a good combination.

Tip - If you cannot get a washer put the old one on your stove hot plate a get really hot and then cool it down quickly, this softens the alloy/copper up again for another go.

When replacing the filter some filters have a nut on the bottom (K&L ?? Look at BC site as they sell them) and this makes life easy but if using genuine or similar use a filter strap that allows you to get a good choke hold up around the mounting base of the filter and a square drive extension and ratchet can then be used allowing you to get a good swing from below for loosening and nipping up. Conventional filter straps cannot fit in the area comfortably and get a good swing hitting the stand etc. Remember when tightening up do a 3/4 turn from initial contact...don't go too tight but make sure it is tight as these will leak and this also puts risk of oil on the back tyre.

Tip - When refitting the filter, fill it with oil as this saves on starving the engine of oil at start up as the pump fills up the filter and try get into the habit of using rubber grease on the rubber seals and o rings etc because when you use oil this can sometimes fool you into thinking you may have an oil weep or may make you assume that it is just residual oil from installation where in fact you do have an oil leak that will get worse and can be potentially dangerous.

Remember to refill the oil to about 3/4's of the site glass and start the engine (Don't rev it) and let idle for about 20 seconds and switch off. Let it sit for about 5 minutes and recheck the site glass. You may have to refill it but just make sure you only go as far as 3/4's on the site glass because if you go anymore you may actually go above and be unaware that you are actually overfilling the engine and this will lead to shit load of problems.

With the chain there are two camps on what I am about to say and more opinions are invited. I always fit a reusable Link to all of my chains so I can remove the chain when washing the bike. I have never experienced any problems by doing this and the only real concern I can see is making sure the link is fitted in the correct direction of travel. When washing the bike I soak the chain over night in kero and brush off the crap, wipe it dry and give it a good blow off with compressed air. I then hang it up and give it a good coat of motul chain lube. This is nice and sticky and does not flick as much as oily chain lubes. I let the lube dry off and refit it and adjust it with a 1' of deflection at the longest part. I will respray the chain once a week/fortnight as I ride daily (approx 100klm, more on weekends) doing this for about two months until it is time to wash the bike again. TD
 
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#5
Edited this post and made a sticky. Thanks to responders.

Keywords: Changing Change Oil How Do I Clean Chain Jack Recommendations
 
#6
That is great stuff 2dogs and a really nice looking Thrux.

Tip - If you cannot get a washer put the old one on your stove hot plate a get really hot and then let it cool down, this softens the alloy/copper up again for another go.

Great tip... since I don't have a hotplate and if I am reusing the washer if I am out... I hold it with some needle-nose pliers and use a bic lighter to heat it up. I try to keep a stash of 1/2 or 12mm crush-washers found at most auto stores.
 
#8
I would like to build my own jack as illustrated above, but I'm not sure whether the tailpipes on the Speedmaster are high enough to avoid denting them:
If you're making your own, especially out of steel like twodogs, You could fabricate up some kind of mounting brackets or "U" posts that make a custom fit under and supports off the frame rails and clears the pipes, or something like that.
 

RoyNC

Street Tracker
#10
Here's my inexpensive jack. Works for changing oil, working on the chain and depending on where you position it you can raise the front or rear tire. Three 2x8's nailed together with a hole for a piece or pipe. The extra 3/4" plywood was added to accommodate the thruxton length shocks.

You Sir are a genious. I love this. Cheap and easy...just like I enjoy my women.
 
#11
Here's my inexpensive jack. Works for changing oil, working on the chain and depending on where you position it you can raise the front or rear tire. Three 2x8's nailed together with a hole for a piece or pipe. The extra 3/4" plywood was added to accommodate the thruxton length shocks.

Awesome!
 
#12
Wow! Glad I looked in this thread!
I have no problem changing my oil or any thing mechanical on my bikes, but I am totally blown away by the improvised jacks. I have one bike stored on front and rear stands for the wonter, so I've been contemplating buying another swingarm stand for Scrammy maintenance over the winter... I will not by buying anything now! Except maybe a long piece of pipe. Thanks!
 
#13
Nice job

Here's my inexpensive jack. Works for changing oil, working on the chain and depending on where you position it you can raise the front or rear tire. Three 2x8's nailed together with a hole for a piece or pipe. The extra 3/4" plywood was added to accommodate the thruxton length shocks.

Great design and a big help. I'm going to build one today. Thanks for the post.
 

JimmyR

Street Tracker
#14
I wish I had read this before I bought and installed a Triumph genuine centre stand! What a PITA to install. Oh well, it's done now.
 
#17
Filters are designed so that the flow of oil enters a sealed area after which the pressurized oil passes through a filter element. Any particulate that you're catching with a magnet would not pass through the filter element anyway.

Furthermore, if you have metal in your oil you have a big problem. People foolishly say that it's normal, and that any motor creates metal shavings under normal use. This is completely wrong.

If you have metal in your oil something is wrong in your motor. Usually related to bearing wear in the crank or transmission, but it could be anything and your motor should be rebuilt.
 
#18
Good comments chaps. I'm new to this forum and have not yet got my Bonnie, which I should pick up on 1st March 2019. Just one question, what torque should the sump plug be? :unsure:
 

rbirkey

NBRAdmin
Staff member
#19
Most of the torque settings you need to know for your new bike will be in the owners manual. If one setting, in particular, isn't, a quick web search should answer your question. I invested in the Triumph Factory Shop Manual for my 2008 Bonneville, and it has literally everything in it! You can also pick up the Haynes manual for less, and it has most of them.
 
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